My LinkedIn newsfeed is full of stories about layoffs and unemployment, with a handful of my friends not being spared from the spectre of redundancy.

Regrettably, some measure their self-worth in materialistic terms – by their income, job title and postcode. With the job taken away, they feel like they’re left wearing the emperor’s new clothes.

I know the feeling.

I was made redundant some years ago. It took several weeks for me to realise that the job didn’t define me or my worth.

I am not going to explore the qualities that may define you, them or me here. However, if you face redundancy, I do hope that you have the support you need to take ownership of your career. If not, you are welcome to contact me for an empathetic, practical and forward-focused conversation.

Instead, I intend to share a little about my current circumstance.

Having chosen to return to Auckland in July after 12-years overseas, I’m now seeking an internationally focused leadership position within a technology-driven business. A role that will utilise proven skills to grow revenue.

However, with the New Zealand general election delayed due to the Auckland Covid-19 outbreak, decision-making, in general, has slowed across the country, and this brings me to my ask.

Call To Action

As a disciplined commercial leader with the ability and experience to scale businesses, I am seeking an introduction to influencers across the New Zealand tech scene.

Having worked in SaaS for 15 years, I understand how go-to-market strategies can achieve a competitive advantage and help companies to succeed internationally.

Your introduction may well open up new avenues of conversation and lead to the next chapter.

Tips For Job Seekers During COVID

I would also like to take the opportunity to offer some advice to others who are looking for a new career opportunity.

I frequently read posts that say “180 applications sent, four interviews secured”, typically talking about the exhausting full-time nature of job seeking. It makes the whole process sound like a factory, which it probably is when considering applicant tracking system algorithms and the 5-10 second glance CV’s may get (if lucky).

Instead, I would advocate for quality over quantity, with improvement in terms of research and preparation for each opportunity – a more focussed approach on existing and established business friendships, as opposed to an overriding emphasis on faceless applications which disappear into the ether.

Sure, it doesn’t always work out.

I interviewed for a position with a top tech firm in August, and after six interviews, was rejected. Still, I am grateful for the initial referral and the constructive feedback which was shared with me afterwards and has since shaped a revised approach.

I did have some apprehension about this post, because of the frank admissions and its forthright nature. However, asking for assistance from business friends in 2020 should be an accepted part of the new norm, and I do hope that my advice is helpful to someone.

In closing, I would like to say that this post was partly inspired by HBR IdeaCast, specifically episode 755 with Alison Beard and Shasta Nelson.

Thanks for your support!

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